Women in Ethiopia’s Governance

The new climate of Ethiopian politics has brought smiles to the faces of the country’s inhabitants with the different political views of a young Prime Minister, who has been taking unusual steps the past six months for his people, but also considering the important of women’s voices in the country.

Women’s voices are necessary in a country’s decision making process, and for democracy, peace, and development. Even though we today see women being involved in many fields of work, and in leadership positions around the world, there are some areas which still prevent women’s representation. And governance is one of such in particular.

Life’s realities of Women from the wealthy mines of DR Congo

If I had other means that would feed my children, I would never step into those threatening darkness; they seem to me like graveyards”, mentioned one young woman who depended solely on the earnings she received from the mines.

The Democratic Republic of Congo is the wealthiest country in the World in terms of natural resources – specifically minerals. Three quarter of the area, 2.345.000Km, is filled with mineral ores such as coltan, nickel, copper, cobalt, zinc, magnesium, limestone, diamond, gold and more. Geologists describe Congo as a land of wonder regarding its potential deposit which is untapped, and more is yet to discover. The Southern part of the country has a deposit of 80% of Cobalt produced in the World and 50% of Copper. These products are used into the manufacture of electrical vehicles, electricity wires, just to name a few.

Girls of Ethiopia Struggle between Water and Virginity

Girls from villages, constantly have more struggles in life when compared to others whose lives are different due their dwelling locations. In the country Yeshi was born and lives in, men don’t share house chores even in its big cities; and even worse it is in the villages of this country – Ethiopia.

The village girls have to go far to fetch water in a ‘gembo’ – a vessel made of clay that is used to collect water; they have to help the farmers with removing weeds when the harvest grows; they have to carry food for their family members working in the farms; they have to collect and carry heavy loads of firewood for the huts; they have to attend to their livestock and milk the cows; and they have to help their mother in the household tasks, and in preparing the family meals.

Lack of Water leads to Infant and Child Mortality in sub-Saharan Africa

Infant mortality! Child mortality! Two expressions interchangeably used to talk about the death of children. But are they the same? Yes they are the same as they both describe mortality of little children. And no, they are not the same, as ‘infant mortality refers to the death of children younger than one year; and child mortality, is the death of children younger than five.