Women Farmers of Uganda

Esther inherited a huge area of land from her father. But after marriage, her husband took over most of it, and decided what is to be produced in there

I was happy with what I was doing in my land. The yams and fruits were feeding us; it also earned me an income – quite a good one I must say” lamented thirty-one year old Esther Wanjala who feels a burden on herself now. “My man was determined to make big money through tobacco. How is that going to feed my children and their children in the future?”

In Uganda, out of the 41 million people, 36 million live in the rural. The rural areas of Uganda witness poverty and the rural dwellers rely on agriculture as their main source of income. In these areas about 22% of the population, live below the national poverty line. And even with a 66% of employment received through farming, food is scarce and insecure in the land. Food insecurity has become a major issue in Uganda.

Why don’t the waters of Unichai wet the grounds of Nediyamadhu?

Then, Lord Shiva easily held Ganga in his locks. Today the people of Nediyamadhu still search for the keys to unlock the Ganga”

Sagar the powerful king of India made a horse sacrifice named ‘AshwamedhaYagya’ to declare his supremacy to the gods. King of heaven Indra who became jealous of this kidnapped the horse, tying it in an ashram of a Sage named Kapil who was meditating. When Sagar went looking for his and found it in the ashram, he assaulted the sage assuming him to be the thief. When the Sage woke up from his trance, his anger arose and he started destroying the sons of Sagar. Sagar’s grandson Anshuman pleaded for forgiveness, and the Sage ordered him to bring down the sacred river Ganga from heaven to purify the souls of the Sage and his ancestors so they could attain enlightenment.

Menses and Fempads: Women Break the Taboo in the DR Congo

For ages, sexual issues have been a big challenge to women and girls. The traditions in this country, mostly in the villages, are highly discriminatory toward women and girls. In this part of the world, women and girls totally depend on men for every single need of theirs. This is because the Congo society is highly paternalistic. Men make the laws and they do everything possible to protect the laws; men get the lion’s share from those traditions that allow them almost everything. Women and girls are passive regarding those traditions. They are not able to change or oppose the men; and if they do, they will be taxed to have committed taboos. Once a woman or a girl is labeled this way, serious punishment follows her. Women and girls then become scared and intimidated by such sanctions; and this fear has caused the women and girls to abide to these traditions even though they are discriminated through them at a large scale.

Forestry and Women

The United Nations General Assembly proclaimed 21 March the International Day of Forests (IDF) in 2012. The Day celebrates and raises awareness of the importance of all types of forests. On each International Day of Forests, countries are encouraged to undertake local, national and international efforts to organize activities involving forests and trees, such as tree planting campaigns. [http://www.fao.org/international-day-of-forests/en/]

Not enough that the three decade civil war caused diverse damage to Sri Lanka, this ‘pearl of the Indian ocean’ continues to face the rise of various challenges out of which deforestation is one. The island which had 49% forest area in the 1920s, has decreased by to 33% in the year 2015 [World Bank Data].